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Annual Instruction Showcase Presentations

Per year, all presentations are listed in alphabetical order by presenter's last name.

2017

Table Of Contents:

The 2017 Instruction Showcase was held on June 15th as a series of two online webinars.
Agenda
Full session recordings:
Morning Session
Afternoon Session
Links directly to the recording for each presentation are available in the "Handouts and additional documentation" section for each presentation.
Finding and Citing Images: Responsible Use of Fashion Images- Molly Beestrum, Columbia College
The Scholarly Article Autopsy: Information Sources from the Inside Out- Krista Bowers Sharpe, Western Illinois University
Traversing the Terrain of 21st Century Publishing: A Practicum- Sarah Dick & Susan Franzen, Illinois State University
Masters of the (Citable) Universe: Maximizing Your Use of Reference Management Software- Kirstin Duffin, Eastern Illinois University
Interrogating Sources with First Year Students- Martinique Hallerduff & Jennifer Lau-Bond, Dominican University & Harper College
A la carte Instruction- Stephanie King & Susan Markwell, Illinois Valley Community College
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2016

Table Of Contents:

The 2016 Instruction Showcase was held on July 20th at Heartland Community College.
Agenda
Recognizing and Joining the Scholarly Conversation- Susan Avery & Kirsten Feist, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Synthesis through New Knowledge Creation- Adam Cassell, MacMurray College
Identifying Themes in Academic Literature- Nancy Falciani-White, Wheaton College
Rethinking a Search Strategy- Susan Franzen, Illinois State University
The Scholarly Conversation: Reading & Applying Scholarly Research: Amy Hall & Sarah Leeman, National-Louis University
Peer Review- Christina Heady & Joshua Vossler, Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Critical Source Evaluation- John Hernandez & Jeannette Moss, Northwestern University
Reviewing Search Strategies in Education- Terry Huttenlock, Wheaton College
Citation Mapping Assignment- Cynthia Kremer, Benedictine University
Finding, Interpreting, and Evaluating Statistical Data Sources for the Arts- April Levy, Columbia College
Citing Online Images- Tim Lockman, Kishwaukee College
Political Internet Literacy- Jennifer Schwartz, DePaul University
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2015

Table Of Contents:

The 2015 Instruction showcase was held on June 18th at North Central College.
Agenda
Research Methods Instruction- Frances Brady, Adler University
Identifying Relevant Information- Samantha Crisp & Rachel Weiss, Augustana College
Identifying, Analyzing, and Evaluating Primary Sources- Belinda Cheek & Kimberly Butler, North Central College
Active Learning Library Instruction Program (ALLI)- Bryan Clark & Jessica Bastian, Illinois Central College
Evaluating Sources: What is a 'Reliable' Source?- Kelly Grossmann, Northeastern Illinois University
Creating Partnerships to Enhance Information Literacy Skills of the Multicultural Communiversity- Ladislava Khailova, Northern Illinois University
Using www.socrative.com in Library Instruction- Stephanie King, Illinois Valley Community College
Working World Internet Research- Elizabeth Nicholson, North Central College
Source Evaluation Quiz- Kimberly Shotick, Northeastern Illinios University
Flexible Models of Embedded Librarianship- Randi Sutter & Colleen Bannon, Heartland Community College
Developing Initial Research Questions- Chelsea Van Riper, Principia College
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2014

Table of Contents:

Agenda
Research Environments- Crystal Boyce, Illinois Wesleyan University
MindMeister: Researching on the Web- Mahrya Carncross, Western Illinois University
Just Get Started With Assessment- Meg Frazier & Megan Jaskowiak, Bradley University
Attribution Decay- Christina Heady, Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Creating Embedded Content- Cynthia Kremer, Benedictine University
Keyword Development and Searching- Andrew Lenaghan and Melvin Whitehead, Joliet Junior College
Flipped Classroom: Exercises for Database Searching- Jeannette Moss & Lauren McKeen, Northwestern University Library
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2013

Table of Contents:

Agenda
Discovery Tools are like Shopping for Jeans- Molly Beestrum, Columbia College Chicago
Oh Rats!- Mahrya Carncross, Western Illinois University
Increasing Engagement with Poll Everywhere- Larissa Garcia, Northern Illinois University
Using Google Spreadsheets for Real-Time Assessment- Michelle Guittar, Northeastern Illinois University
Locating Academic Sources- Heather Jagman, DePaul University Library
Source Evaluation: Context and Appropriateness- Laura Mondt, Richland Community College
Wikipedia as a Research Tool- Alexis Shpall Wolstein, Milner Library – Illinois State University
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Finding and Citing Images: Responsible Use of Fashion Images

Year: 2017
Name and Title: Molly Beestrum
Institution: Columbia College
Session Description: Students have to create an image collection and concept board with cited image sources. Citing images - specifically fashion images - has been an ongoing challenge.
Target Audience: This activity and discussion were designed for an Introduction to Fashion Studies course geared toward first or second year undergraduates (interested in the Fashion Studies major). This activity can be adapted for citing images for any visual arts topic - I'm adapting it currently for Photography and Visual Culture.
Student Learning Objectives:
  • Students will be able to identify a variety of sources for images, including web and social media and library databases.
  • Students will be able to understand the complexity of access to information, including copyright and economic value of information.
  • Students will be able to legally and ethically incorporate images into their own work by identifying the key components of an image citation.
Activity Description: I developed this activity to get students thinking both where to source images (from social media and the web, as well as fashion databases) and how to cite them (based on the information they can locate).
Handouts and Additional Documentation:

Lesson Plan
LibGuide: http://libguides.colum.edu/introtofashionstudies
Presentation Slides
Presentation Recording

Applied Framework:
  • Additional applicable Knowledge Practices and Dispositions are mentioned in the Lesson Plan.

Information has Value: Knowledge Practice 1
Information has Value: Disposition 1
Information has Value: Disposition 2
Research as Inquiry: Disposition 8

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The Scholarly Article Autopsy: Information Sources from the Inside Out

Year: 2017
Name and Title: Krista Bowers Sharpe
Institution: Western Illinois University
Session Description with Activity Description: This lesson is intended as a single session within a major’s research methods course. Rather than using a shorter “scholarly vs. non-scholarly” comparison worksheet, this activity asks students to work in groups to systematically examine a scholarly article in depth, identify and evaluate its various components visually and in writing, and then compare it to a non-scholarly article on the same topic. Groups then report back to the entire class. Discussion is guided so as to touch on the processes by which sources are created, what these methods say about their authority, and to consider contextually appropriate uses for them.   
Target Audience: Although the activity was developed for students taking two social science majors' research methods courses (SOC 323 and ANTH 305), it could be adapted to any setting that lends itself to in-depth examination of information creation processes, the construction of authority, and the contextual appropriateness of sources.
Student Learning Objectives:
  • The student will be able to identify the standard elements of scholarly writing.
  • The student will be able to distinguish scholarly from non-scholarly literature.
  • The student will be able to select the appropriate type of source to use in various contexts.
Handouts and Additional Documentation:

Lesson Plan
Presentation Slides
Presentation Recording

Applied Framework:
  • Additional applicable Knowledge Practices and Dispositions are mentioned in the Lesson Plan.

Authority Is Constructed and Contextual: Knowledge Practice 2
Information Creation as a Process: Knowledge Practice 1
Information Creation as a Process: Knowledge Practice 2
Information Creation as a Process: Disposition 1
Information Creation as a Process: Disposition 2

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Traversing the Terrain of 21st Century Publishing: A Practicum

Year: 2017
Name and Title: Sarah Dick & Susan Franzen
Institution: Illinois State University
Session Description: Many are the routes to successful publication but the path is frequently bewildering and, without forethought, can be treacherous. An online instruction session for PhD Nursing students focused on navigating the various types of available publication—open access, traditional, or licensing combinations—all while accessing tools to help with journal selection and negotiating author rights. 21st century publishing has become complex and confusing; this session served as a practical, hands-on preparation toward successful scholarship.
Target Audience: Although specifically designed for graduate level PhD Nursing students, this instruction can be easily adapted to any subject area as well as various audiences, including undergraduates, masters-level students, and certainly faculty.
Student Learning Objectives:
  • The student will be able to select a journal appropriate for their writing project.
  • The student will understand their author rights as related to their selected journal.
Activity Description: As a follow-up to a prior information-based presentation, this hands-on session required students to select appropriate keywords to describe their writing, search for potential journals, analyze selected journals, and consider copyright, open access, and predatory publishing. 
Handouts and Additional Documentation:

Lesson Plan
Webpage used during lesson: Navigating the World of Citation Metrics
Lib Guide: http://guides.library.illinoisstate.edu/c.php?g=663219
Presentation Slides
Presentation Recording

 
Applied Framework:
  • Additional applicable Knowledge Practices and Dispositions are mentioned in the Lesson Plan.

Authority Is Constructed and Contextual: Knowledge Practice 2
Information Creation as a Process: Knowledge Practice 3
Information has Value: Knowledge Practice 3
Information has Value: Knowledge Practice 6
Scholarship as Conversation: Knowledge Practice 2
Searching as Strategic Exploration: Knowledge Practice 4

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Masters of the (Citable) Universe: Maximizing Your Use of Reference Management Software

Year: 2017
Name and Title: Kirstin Duffin
Institution: Eastern Illinois University
Session Description: The citation management workshop is one of a three-part graduate student seminar series. The seminars are offered as drop-in, hour-long events. With the marketing assistance of the graduate school and faculty graduate coordinators, we encourage advance registration. The coordinator of the series recommended I present this session as a lecture; after receiving feedback from participants and following my own hunches of engagement best practices, I converted it into a hands-on workshop. Presentation slides and an optional citation management exercise, which I created, are available at http://booth.eiu.edu/thesisworkshop. Plans to provide recorded presentations are in the works. These will be available on demand for student use. For the Instruction Showcase, I will review the successes and challenges of presenting this material as an interactive session.
Target Audience: This material can be presented at the undergraduate level. I developed a citation management assignment for lower-level biology students of a required, majors-only skill-building course. My initial assignment has proved to be too advanced for many students of this course, so I will be creating a simplified assignment for future use.
Student Learning Objectives:
  • The student will be able to identify an appropriate citation management tool for their personal research use.
  • The student will be able to add sources to a citation management tool.
  • The student will be able to insert in-­text citations and a works cited section into a word processing document.
Activity Description: The citation management workshop introduces the interfaces of two freely-available applications, Mendeley and Zotero. In the workshop, we review capacities to add, organize, cite, collaborate, and use some of the advanced features of these tools.
Handouts and Additional Documentation:

Lesson Plan
Research Guide: https://booth.library.eiu.edu/subjectsPlus/subjects/guide.php?subject=thesis
Presentation Slides
Presentation Recording

Applied Framework:
  • Additional applicable Knowledge Practices and Dispositions are mentioned in the Lesson Plan.

Information has Value: Knowledge Practice 1
Information has Value: Disposition 1
Research as Inquiry: Knowledge Practice 6
Research as Inquiry: Disposition 7
Scholarship as Conversation: Knowledge Practice 1

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Interrogating Sources with First Year Students

Year: 2017
Name and Title: Martinique Hallerduff & Jennifer Lau-Bond
Institution: Dominican University & Harper College
Session Description: We have found that students are often charged with simply locating and using resources for research projects but rarely have the opportunity to discover or reflect on how information is created or shared. Instead of beginning with direct instruction, we employ a problem-based learning activity to allow students to explore the sources on their own initially.
Target Audience: The intended audience for this instruction activity is students in a First Year Seminar or similar course, though it would also work in any 100-level college course. It is easily adaptable for upper level students by modifying the resources explored and the question prompts to address the desired portions of the Framework. Moreover, Google Forms is a useful tool for librarians to capture student work in class or collect data about student in-class performance.
Student Learning Objectives:
  • Students will describe the qualities/features of different formats and categorize these resources by type in order to examine the idea that information is valued differently in different contexts.
  • Students will investigate an author’s background and profession in order to define different types of authority.
Activity Description: This activity prompts students to examine and evaluate a variety of information sources and record their findings in Google Forms. We project these findings in class and use the results to provide feedback and focus discussion.
Handouts and Additional Documentation:

Lesson Plan
Presentation Slides
Presentation Recording

Applied Framework:

Authority Is Constructed and Contextual: Knowledge Practice 1
Authority Is Constructed and Contextual: Knowledge Practice 2
Authority Is Constructed and Contextual: Knowledge Practice 4
Information Creation as a Process: Knowledge Practice 1

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A la carte Instruction

Year: 2017
Name and Title: Stephanie King & Susan Markwell
Institution: Illinois Valley Community College
Session Description: Add some spice to your library instruction by mixing and matching components to fit the structure of the class you’re teaching. We’ll look at the elements of a lesson plan for a single face-to-face session and how to transform these familiar ingredients by incorporating pre-session “appetizers,” asynchronous “side dishes,” and post-session “desserts.” Adapt your current practices into interchangeable options in order to develop your own customizable instruction menu.
Target Audience: Online, blended, face-to-face, synchronous, asynchronous – whatever flavor of instruction you’re providing, there’s a diverse menu of options to meet your tastes.
Student Learning Objectives (for sample lesson plan):
  • Students will identify appropriate search terms for their topics.
  • Students will locate at least one article in a library database.
  • Students will create an APA-style citation for their source.
Activity Description: Description
Handouts and Additional Documentation:

Sample Lesson Plan
Handout
Presentation Slides
Presentation Recording

Applied Framework:

Research as Inquiry: Knowledge Practice 3
Research as Inquiry: Knowledge Practice 4
Research as Inquiry: Knowledge Practice 6
Searching as Strategic Exploration: Knowledge Practice 8

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Recognizing and Joining the Scholarly Conversation

Year: 2016
Name and Title: Susan Avery- Instructional Services Librarian
Kirsten Feist- Instructional Support Specialist
Institution: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Session Description: This session is intended for a first-year writing class and is focused on understanding and identifying the concept of the scholarly conversation. Using the course assignment as a jumping off point, the library instruction will introduce evaluative criteria that can be applied to sources located via a variety of venues, from web pages to databases to blogs. Working as teams, students evaluate a specific source, determining the conversation in which the author is engaging and whether or not that particular conversation is likely to contribute value to an academic paper focused on that topic.

This activity can be adapted to subject-specific courses at varying levels. The important element that must carry over is the focus on the scholarly conversation. Discussions with instructors can determine the relevancy of this particular focus. Suggestions for incorporating this lesson into other class settings will be shared during the course of the presentation.

Target Audience: First-year writing class, but can be adapted to subject-specific courses at varying levels.
Student Learning Objectives:
  • Students will be able to recognize the value of information on the same topic from a variety of academic and popular perspectives in order to contextualize the scope of the scholarly conversation.
  • Students will be able to apply evaluative criteria to resources in order to determine the appropriateness of each for their research task.
Activity Description: The class assignment expectations (as stated by the instructor) will be reviewed to provide students with a context for the instruction that is about to take place. The Is my source scholarly? document (table side) is briefly reviewed. Particular attention is paid to the “Author” category in order to assist students in developing a context for understanding the author of the conversations in the activity that follows. Students are directed to the “Class Activity” tab in the Rhetoric Library Guide. Each group/pair shares with the class their evaluation of the resource, answering the questions regarding conversation.
Handouts and Additional Documentation:

Lesson Plan
Handout

Applied Framework: Scholarship as Conversation: Knowledge Practice 3
Scholarship as Conversation: Knowledge Practice 4

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Synthesis through New Knowledge Creation

Year: 2016
Name: Adam Cassell
Title: Public Services Librarian
Institution: MacMurray College
Session Description: This activity uses SecDef Rumsfeld’s ‘Known Unknowns’ paradigm that he used to describe the challenges of the Iraq war. Beginning with what you know, expanding to what you know that you don’t know, progressing to the new information of what you didn’t know that you didn’t know, and ending with a synthesis of all 3 through the creation of new knowledge.
Target Audience: sophomore final research paper; could be used by other courses.
Student Learning Objectives:
  • Refine research question
  • Identify resources
  • New research map/plan of attack
  • Begin to synthesize ideas
Activity Description: This activity uses the provided handout to guide students through topic development and keyword generation.
Handouts and Additional Documentation: Lesson Plan
Handout
Applied Framework: Research as Inquiry: Knowledge Practice 1
Information Creation as a Process: Knowledge Practice 8

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Identifying Themes in Academic Literature

Year: 2016
Name: Nancy Falciani-White
Title: Associate Professor of Library Science
Institution: Wheaton College
Session Description: While students often struggle to find appropriate sources for their academic work, an even greater struggle is their ability to use those sources appropriately, once they've found them. This presentation describes an activity intended to give students hands-on practice reading academic literature, with the express purpose of identifying topics and themes that can be used to synthesize the literature for a literature review.
Target Audience: The activity is intended for students with some academic experience (ideally 2nd semester undergraduates or above). This presentation is appropriate for anyone teaching students (either undergraduate or graduate) how to synthesize literature. It is most appropriate for classes in the sciences or social sciences. The activity can easily be adapted to almost any context, simply by identifying article abstracts relevant to the class. A class in the humanities might need to locate a different “synthesis” video.
Student Learning Objectives:
  • Students will be able to identify topics/themes in psychological literature.
  • Students will be able to organize those themes as they would for a literature review.
Activity Description: Remind students of the literature review they are expected to write, and what it should look like. Introduce different ways of organizing a literature review (e.g., chronologically, thematically). Think-Pair-Share to read article abstracts, discuss themes found in teh abstracts, and share themes found. Discuss how those articles and themes could be written out in a literature review; Organization of themes and how a literature review needs to logically “flow.”
Handouts and Additional Documentation: Lesson Plan and Handout
Applied Framework: Scholarship as Conversation: Knowledge Practice 1
Scholarship as Conversation: Knowledge Practice 6

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Rethinking a search strategy

Year: 2016
Name: Susan Franzen
Title: Nursing & Health Sciences Librarian
Institution: Illinois State University
Session Description: Students often struggle with altering search strategies when their first attempts do not locate appropriate results. This instruction session is designed to give students experience altering a search with no results and is intended to be a follow-up to an introductory searching session.
Target Audience: While the CINAHL database is the focus of this session and the intended audience is health sciences students, this activity can easily be adapted for any subject area and database. Librarians would simply change the scenario and research question, so it would be applicable to their liaison areas and then have students search in a relevant database.
Student Learning Objectives:
  • Use PICO question to find evidence-based articles
  • Revise a CINAHL search for more accurate results
  • Evaluate search results for best evidence
Activity Description: In this session, health sciences students are given a scenario of a student who did an unsuccessful search in CINAHL to answer the PICO (patient, intervention, comparison, outcome) question "Does the use of ginger reduce nausea and vomiting in the post op patient?" In pairs, students revise the unsuccessful search. They are asked to do the new search in two different ways and decide which is best. Groups volunteer to present their strategies to the class. As a follow-up, students do the same search on their own, fill out a worksheet, and submit it during their next class period.
Handouts and Additional Documentation: Handout
Applied Framework:

Searching as Strategic Exploration: Knowledge Practice 5
Research as Inquiry: Knowledge Practice 7
Research as Inquiry: Knowledge Practice 8

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The Scholarly Conversation: Reading & Applying Scholarly Research

Year: 2016
Name and Title: Amy Hall- Librarian
Sarah Leeman- Online Learning & Web Support Librarian
Institution: National-Louis University
Session Description: This presentation demonstrates a lesson designed for use with traditional-aged undergraduates in National Louis University’s Harrison Professional Pathways (HP3) program. HP3 is designed to address common roadblocks to college completion, especially for historically under-represented students. Most students are below “college ready,” as defined by ACT scores. In designing this two-part activity focused on the scholarly conversation, we chose scholarly articles of interest to this demographic, covering such topics as snooping in relationships, reality TV, and social media usage.
Target Audience: 1st semester undergraduates (can be modified for additional subjects or levels)
Student Learning Objectives:
  • Describe the purpose and findings of a scholarly research study
  • Use evidence from a scholarly source to support a thesis
Activity Description: In part 1, students consider what makes an article “scholarly,” and then practice strategic tips and techniques for reading, interpreting, and discussing scholarly research. In part 2, students pull and cite specific pieces of evidence (both direct quotes and paraphrases) from a scholarly article to help answer a selected research question. The subject matter and reading level of the research, as well as the difficulty of the assessment, could be modified to suit other audiences.
Handouts and Additional Documentation: Lesson Plan
Suggested Materials
Applied Framework:

Scholarship as Conversation: Knowledge Practice 1
Scholarship as Conversation: Knowledge Practice 5
Information has Value: Knowledge Practice 1
Information has Value: Disposition 1
Information has Value: Disposition 3
Scholarship as Conversation: Disposition 3

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PEER REVIEW

Year: 2016
Name and Title: Christina Heady- Education Librarian & Coordinator of First-Year Instruction
Joshua Vossler- Head of Reference and Instruction
Institution: Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Session Description: First-year instructors frequently request that we teach students how to find peer reviewed articles. Their students arrive at our sessions as a blank slate: they have never encountered scholarly articles, learned about peer review, or searched a library database. This icebreaker activity engages students with the process of peer review before explaining its purpose. Instructors appreciate that this activity emphasizes the nuances of peer review, painting a more accurate picture of the material they are required to utilize. This activity gives a strong first impression before launching into database searching, explaining why we ask them to evaluate everything, including scholarly articles. Students have a tendency to think in binary--everything is either true or false. Reality tends to be much more complicated and messy, which is an important reminder for students at any level.
Target Audience: The provided lesson plan is intended for first-year undergraduate students but could be tailored to any level, including students in doctoral programs.
Student Learning Objectives:
  • Find scholarly articles in a library database.
Activity Description:

This activity is used as an icebreaker in a one-shot session but could also be used as an exercise to introduce a unit on peer reviewed materials or evaluation in a credit-bearing course.

Handouts and Additional Documentation: Lesson Plan and Activity
Applied Framework: Authority Is Constructed and Contextual: Knowledge Practice 1

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Critical Source Evaluation

Year: 2016
Name and Title: John Hernandez- Web & Mobile Services Librarian
Jeannette Moss- Reference & Instruction Librarian
Institution: Northwestern University
Session Description: This presentation focuses on an instructional approach for a first-year writing seminar where students were given the estimated economic costs of drug addiction in the United States from a government website that does not disclose how it arrived at the figures. Students worked in groups, with each group assigned a specific figure from the government site, to trace source notes back to original research, strategically read those articles, and identify methods used to arrive at stated costs.
Target Audience: This instructional activity and assignment can be adapted for any course where social statistics are examined to hone critical thinking skills, further scholarly conversation, or add meaning, such as in exploring societal issues, social policy, or related topics. This approach can be modified to include pre/post assignment quizzes.
Student Learning Objectives:
  • To critically evaluate statistical information rather than just accept it at face value.
  • To strategically and efficiently read scholarly research articles for method and other important details.
  • To citation search backward to original research.
Activity Description: During the library session, librarians introduced the class to the concept of strategically reading scientific articles through a short video and brief discussion, then met with each group individually. The groups discussed tracking citations backwards to original studies, strategic reading, and evaluation of information. One week later, the groups presented their findings to the class, focusing on evaluating sources and methods, currency of data, gaps unfilled or questions unanswered, and lessons learned from the exercise.
Handouts and Additional Documentation:

Lesson Plan
Handout
Slides-GoogleDoc
Slides-PDF

Applied Framework:

Research as Inquiry: Knowledge Practice 1
Research as Inquiry: Knowledge Practice 5
Scholarship as Conversation: Disposition 1
Scholarship as Conversation: Disposition 5

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Reviewing Search Strategies in Education

Year: 2016
Name: Terry Huttenlock
Title: Associate Professor of Library Science
Institution: Wheaton College
Session Description: This session demonstrates an engagement technique that can be used for any instruction session, rather than highlighting the teaching of a specific topic.
Target Audience: Educational Research Class -  Master’s or 5-year BA/MAT education majors.  Best with smaller class sizes but can be adapted to larger classes.
Student Learning Objectives:
  • Students will be able to identify strategies to use in searching for information on an education topic.
Activity Description: After having students take a 3-question pre-session critical incident survey (using esurv.org), students do a "round robin" at the start of a 50-minute research instruction session. Taking questions and issues identified in the responses, create questions. The number of questions is determined by the number in the class. Three per group works best. Each group is given a question and has 2 minutes (using a Powerpoint slide that is designed as a timer) to answer the question. The questions are then passed to the next group in a "round robin" fashion for them to add to the answers. This continues until the question gets back to the first group. Each group then reads the answers. This can be both broad and narrow in scope and fit any of the framework elements. This is both engaging and relevant since it is based on information provided by the students and peer learning.
Handouts and Additional Documentation: Lesson Plan
Applied Framework: This can be used for any framework based on the questions in the pre-session survey.
Other Tools

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Citation Mapping Assignment

Year: 2016
Name: Cynthia Kremer
Title: Science Outreach Librarian
Institution: Benedictine University
Session Description: The Outreach team at Benedictine University conducted six workshops for faculty each based on one of the Information Literacy Frames. For our workshop #4, Scholarship as Conversation, we adapted a citation mapping assignment from CORA to help demonstrate the frame to faculty and then used the activity in our instruction sessions.
Target Audience: Unspecified.
Student Learning Objectives:
  • Students will use the "Cited By" feature in Google Scholar in order to follow the flow of information between articles.
  • Students will compare citations in order to identify connections between scholarly articles.
Activity Description: In this activity, the students search for a notable, available article on their research topic (sustainability and environment) in Google Scholar. Then they write the article title and "cited by" number in the center of the sheet of paper. Then the students open the article and review the works cited section to find 2 more articles to look up via Google Scholar. The student writes these two articles' titles and "cited by" numbers to the left of the main article, and draws arrows back to the sources showing that the information from those articles flowed forward into the main article. Then the students bring up the main article again and click on cited by to find two articles that cite the main article. The student writes the articles' titles and "cited by" numbers to the right of the main article, and draws arrows from those new articles back to the main article.
Handouts and Additional Documentation: Lesson Plan
Handout
Applied Framework: Scholarship as Conversation: Knowledge Practice 1

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Finding, Interpreting, and Evaluating Statistical Data Sources for the Arts

Year: 2016
Name: April Levy
Title: Reference & Instruction Librarian
Institution: Columbia College
Session Description: How do we teach undergraduate students to read and interpret data, and begin to understand how data can be used by businesses? A librarian worked with a Business faculty member to develop new curriculum for a 1st/2nd year Managerial Economics course that introduced students to reading, analyzing, and interpreting data, as well as learning the value of data for arts businesses.
Target Audience: 1st/2nd year Managerial Economics course. In addition to business and economics classes, this lesson can be adapted for use in social sciences courses that utilize statistical data.
Student Learning Objectives:
  • Discover which entities collect statistical data on the arts industry.
  • Articulate characteristics of reliable statistical data.
  • Extract actionable information about the arts and the economy from a comparison of two graphs produced by different entities
Activity Description: The librarian introduced students to freely-available secondary sources of statistical data about the arts. Students then worked in small groups to compare arts industry data in two graphs. They practiced interpreting the data, discussed what entities collect data, how data collection is valued by the market, and how accessible data is depending on its producers, government, etc.
Handouts and Additional Documentation: Lesson Plan
Applied Framework:

Authority Is Constructed and Contextual: Knowledge Practice 2
Information has Value: Knowledge Practice 5
Information has Value: Disposition 2

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Citing Online Images

Year: 2016
Name: Tim Lockman
Title: Reference & Instruction Librarian
Institution: Kishwaukee College
Session Description: Learners will practice academic integrity by discovering Creative Commons licensed images, applying some essential technical skills, and completing a final product—a presentation slide with a credited image—in approximately 30 minutes.
Target Audience: The workshop is designed for first-year college students, but could also be adapted for upper-level undergraduates.
Student Learning Objectives:
  • Learners will practice academic integrity by utilizing Creative Commons licensed images that are appropriate for reuse in an academic setting.
  • Learners will apply essential technical skills in order to create a presentation slide with an appropriately attributed image.
Activity Description: The activity involves multiple steps and requires a lot of hands-on help from the instruction librarian, but is also very engaging for the students. Our “digital natives” often are surprised at new ways of accessing content (e.g., the Google Images search limits); many discover valuable and practical new technical skills (e.g., creating links out of plain text); and they finish with a final product very similar to something they might use in an authentic college assignment. And besides engaging with the content and the librarian, students also engage with one another. We have observed students helping others who are struggling, doing some spontaneous peer teaching. This is an opportunity for them to stretch themselves intellectually, technically, and socially. Librarians may collect the worksheets as assessment artifacts. If desired, they also may have students submit their presentation slides via print or email and retain them as evidence of student learning.
Handouts and Additional Documentation:

Lesson Plan

Handout

Applied Framework:

Scholarship as Conversation: Knowledge Practice 1
Information Has Value: Disposition 2
Scholarship As Conversation: Disposition 3
Scholarship As Conversation: Disposition 6

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Political Internet Literacy

Year: 2016
Name: Jennifer Schwartz
Title: Humanities and Social Sciences Librarian
Institution: DePaul University
Session Description: As the liaison for the political science department, I worked with a faculty member to design an information literacy component for his 300 level course: The Internet, Technology, and Politics. This course investigates the impact of the internet on political communication, campaigning, and organizing. Working together, we discussed the ACRL Framework, and decided that two frames would be especially useful for structuring my portion of the lesson: Authority Is Constructed and Contextual, and Research as Inquiry.
Target Audience: Undergraduate students in a political science class, who have already had some basic library instruction.
This activity could easily be adapted for any undergraduate student who has had some exposure to library research before.
Student Learning Objectives:
  • Students will be able to find research articles about current events and politics.
  • Students will understand that there are difference between articles written in general magazines, articles written in scholarly journals, and articles written for partisan political purposes.
  • Students will begin to understand that research is a process.
  • Students will begin to understand that authority is created and contextual.
Activity Description: My class session began with an overview of how to use the library’s resources for research purposes. I then presented the students with a “claim” that might reasonably show up in a social media feed dealing with the current political climate, like: ”The Democratic use of superdelegates is undemocratic”. At this point, the students were instructed to research that claim, taking notes on a form which prompted the students to record a few things about their search. Specifically, we were interested in whether they thought what they found was authoritative, and how it advanced the conversation. At the end of the session, we debriefed as a class, and discussed how we determine authority and how our research is driven through inquiry.
Handouts and Additional Documentation: Lesson Plan
Applied Framework:

Authority Is Constructed and Contextual: Knowledge Practice 1
Authority Is Constructed and Contextual: Knowledge Practice 2
Research as Inquiry: Knowledge Practice 5

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Research Methods Instruction

Year: 2015
Name: Frances Brady
Title: Presenter Title
Institution: Adler University
Session Description: I will demonstrate an activity I use with graduate students in helping them prepare to write a literature review for their Research Methods class. Faculty at Adler University have found that our students are not clear on what distinguishes a literature review from an annotated bibliography. Students also have trouble using critical thinking skills to think outside the box when their first attempt at searching retrieves too many or too few results. I worked directly with a teaching faculty member in the Clinical PsyD department to integrate my activity into her syllabus. Through this collaboration, we generated excitement to other faculty and I was able to use this activity in all but one of the Research Methods classes in the Clinical PsyD program this spring, as well as all the Research Methods class in the Masters of Art Therapy program. In my presentation, I will give a short background on the partnerships which helped create this activity, as well as demonstrate part of the activity itself.
Target Audience: Second year graduate students in Research Methods classes (working on literature reviews)
Student Learning Objectives:
  • Students will be able to explain the connection between previously published research and their own literature reviews. 
  • Students will be able to reframe their searches, as necessary, based on the results in order to find appropriate resources for their literature reviews.
Activity Description:

In this activity, I use the abstract from a published article to brainstorm with the class how we would start the literature review. The article’s literature review found there is little research done specifically on the topic the article is addressing, so I then work with the class to help them expand their ideas of what should be included in the literature review. We then go through the first couple paragraphs of the literature review to see why the authors included certain citations and discuss any possible improvements to the article.

Concepts and Tools: My presentation covers evaluation of citations, authority, scholarly conversation

Handouts and Additional Documentation:

Handout

Applied Framework:

Scholarship as Conversation: Knowledge Practice 5
Scholarship as Conversation: Knowledge Practice 6

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Identifying Relevant Information

Year: 2015
Name and Title: Samantha Crisp
Rachel Weiss
Institution: Augustana College
Session Description: This presentation will focus on a collaborative effort between Thomas Tredway Library’s Special Collections Librarian and one of our Research and Instruction Librarians. We collaborated to teach an immersive instruction session over the course of two class periods to engage students in comparing and contrasting primary source documents and secondary sources. This session targeted students in one section of Augustana College’s Rhetoric and the Liberal Arts course (LSFY101), which is part of a three-term Liberal Studies sequence for first year students. The session had three goals: to teach students to identify relevant information in primary and secondary sources, to help them synthesize diverse sources, and to encourage them to reflect on their research process.
Target Audience: First year students
Student Learning Objectives:
  • At the end of the session, students were better equipped to:
    • think about a primary source and situate the source within a historical context,
    • compare and contrast information contained within primary sources,
    • contextualize that information using secondary sources,
    • make connections between historical and current events,
    • and thoughtfully reflect on their research process.
    • Greater facility with library sources and searching was a secondary outcome.
Activity Description:

LSFY101 is an introductory writing course for students built upon a single foundational text. This year’s text, The Round House by Louise Erdrich, explores racial tension and trauma in a predominantly Native American rural community. Our LSFY courses also have a series of skills goals for each term; in the fall term, the information literacy goal is to engage in exploratory research to generate ideas and questions. Students came to the library to learn basic research tools for locating books and articles, and to explore primary sources related to local historic Native communities. Students then wrote a short essay comparing selected primary and secondary sources and reflecting on their research process. They also completed handouts guiding them through primary source analysis and synthesis across sources.

Concepts and Tools: Exploratory research to generate ideas and questions, primary source evaluation and analysis, synthesizing information across diverse sources, classifying and comparing sources, and keyword generation.

Handouts and Additional Documentation:

Handout

Exercise

Applied Framework:

Research as Inquiry: Knowledge Practice 2
Research as Inquiry: Knowledge Practice 3
Research as Inquiry: Knowledge Practice 6
Research as Inquiry: Knowledge Practice 7

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Identifying, Analyzing, and Evaluating Primary Sources

Year: 2015
Name and Title: Belinda Cheek
Kimberly Butler
Institution: North Central College
Session Description:

This session will provide an overview of an information literacy session presented jointly by the Library  and the Archives that teaches students to locate, identify, analyze, and evaluate primary sources and incorporates three hands-on activities that emphasize these skills.  As the session is used with students in the Education program at North Central, we also encourage them to begin thinking about how they might incorporate primary sources in their own classrooms and where they might find resources that will assist them with lesson planning.  The showcase session will demonstrate an abbreviated version of one of the three hands-on activities.

Target Audience: Elementary Education majors and/or History majors who are also majoring in Secondary Education
Student Learning Objectives:
  • Students will be able to determine whether a source is primary or secondary. 
  • Students will be able to analyze and evaluate both virtual and physical primary sources and consider issues such as bias and author authority/reliability.
  • Students will be able to identify resources and activities that would be effective for use in their own teaching.
Activity Description:

Concepts and tools: The main concepts covered include identifying, analyzing, and evaluating primary sources.  The session also covers locating primary sources with a special emphasis on utilizing local archives and special collections.

Session is used with the following courses: EDN 228 Elementary Teaching I (introduction to teaching methods, including instructional strategies…emphasis is on direct teaching, interactive instructional strategies); EDN 348 Techniques in Secondary Education Social Studies

Handouts and Additional Documentation:

Handout

Applied Framework:

Authority Is Constructed and Contextual: Knowledge Practice 1
Authority Is Constructed and Contextual: Knowledge Practice 2
Authority Is Constructed and Contextual: Knowledge Practice 3
Information Creation as a Process: Knowledge Practice 1
Information Creation as a Process: Knowledge Practice 2
Information Creation as a Process: Knowledge Practice 3
Information Creation as a Process: Knowledge Practice 4

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Active Learning Library Instruction Program

Year: 2015
Name and Title: Bryan Clark
Jessica Bastian
Institution: Illinois Central College
Session Description: Illinois Central College has developed an Active Learning Library Instruction (ALLI) program that moves away from the ‘one shot’ instruction session and actively involves students in their own learning of library concepts.  Through the use of planned worksheets, the students lead themselves through the learning process with the librarian actively interacting with them to offer guidance in successfully completing the ALLI activities.  ICC librarians present interactive instruction sessions that offer faculty a means of assessing learning, especially the student’s ability to meet the college’s information literacy general education goals.
Target Audience: Community College students
Student Learning Objectives:
  • Research Keyword Activity Objectives; Students will be able to:
    1. identify keywords for a topic
    2. combine keywords to construct search statements
    3. evaluate the best keyword combination
    4. refine search using limiters
    5. select an appropriate article on the topic
  • Website Credibility Objectives; By the end of the activity, the student will
    1. understand the importance of source credibility
    2. use the C.R.A.P. test to determine credibility(supplied on worksheet)
    3. explain the rationale in determining credibility
    4. apply credibility standards to the research process.
Activity Description: Concepts and tools: Keyword generation and website credibility
Handouts and Additional Documentation:

Handout

Exercise

Applied Framework:

Searching as Strategic Exploration: Knowledge Practice 3
Searching as Strategic Exploration: Knowledge Practice 7
Scholarship as Conversation: Knowledge Practice 4

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Evaluating Sources: What is a Reliable Source

Year: 2015
Name: Kelly Grossmann
Title: Presenter Title
Institution: Northeastern Illinois University
Session Description: This presentation demonstrates a lesson, developed for the STEM disciplines, to give real world context and meaning to the notion that "authority is constructed and contextual" (ACRL Information Literacy Frame 1). The lesson involves a short lecture portion followed by an activity that provides students with practice evaluating metadata to determine the authority and credibility of a source. The lesson, inspired by the recent "War on Science" issue of National Geographic, invites students to consider the causes of disconnect between concepts commonly accepted in the scientific community and the frequent rejection of such concepts by the public at large.
Target Audience: Upper level undergraduates; early graduate students.
Student Learning Objectives:
  • Students will:
    • compare the authority of a number of sources to filter non-credibile sources.
    • identify metadata features and explore how they can provide clues to the authority of a source.
    • consider the credibility of sources provided by a common search engine.
    • use research tools and indicators of authority to determine the credibility of sources, understanding the elements that might temper this credibility
    • (from the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy in Higher Education).
Activity Description:

The activity associated with this presentation asks students to suppose they are working for a legistor to help inform a policy decision regarding a common pesticide. Students will analyze common features and metadata of articles to help determine the credibility of the sources. From their analyses, the students will determine which articles will be kept for the legislator, or ignored for lacking credibility. The articles chosen for this activity focus on a single topic (neonicotinoids and bee health), but have varying degrees of credibility, pushing students to move beyond the use of a singular measure for evaluation. Students will then perform a Google search and verbally discuss the credibility of the results.

This presentation covers the concepts of: evaluation of information, creation of information (briefly), and analysis of authority.

Handouts and Additional Documentation:

Handout

Applied Framework:

Authority Is Constructed and Contextual: Knowledge Practice 2
Scholarship as Conversation: Knowledge Practice 4

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Creating Partnerships to Enhance Information Literacy Skills of the Multicultural Communiversity

Year: 2015
Name: Ladislava Khailova
Title: Presenter Title
Institution: Northern Illinois University
Session Description: In response to the increasing diversification of the American society, this presentation focuses on the need of academic libraries to reach out beyond their immediate clientele to enhance the information literacy skills of the multicultural members of the external community. The success of these efforts depends closely on the libraries’ ability to form and sustain partnerships with campus and off-campus units already involved with the targeted communities. NIU Libraries offered a series of family literacy workshops to help local Hispanic parents boost their children’s emerging literacy skills. In the process parents were encouraged to develop skills for locating, evaluating, and using effectively all types of library resources (with special emphasis on bilingual sources). Specifically, parents were introduced to the Libraries’ online catalog system, call number interpretation, the physical space of the English-Spanish juvenile collection, and community user privileges. For the purposes of advertising, recruitment, and parent training, the program coordinator initiated a process of identifying possible collaborators and then reached out to them to collectively create a program of action. The on-campus units of Research and Program Development in the Division of Students Affairs and the Latino Resource Center were involved; off campus a non-profit education organization, a Hispanic church, and a nearby community college were invited to participate. The presentation offers specific suggestions for academic libraries interested in similar outreach information literacy efforts build on partnerships with on-campus and off-campus entities.
Target Audience: Multicultural community external to the university (adult continuing learners).
Student Learning Objectives:
  • As for the target population, the learning outcomes included the following:
    • parents will be able to articulate their need for information related to enhancing their children's literacy skills;
    • parents will be able to find and utilize available online library tools (such as the catalog) to locate the sources needed to fulfill their information need;
    • parents will be able to interpret the retrieved call numbers and physically locate the desired materials;
    • parents will be able to physically locate the items;
    • parents will understand the mechanisms involved in checking out the retrieved items.
Activity Description: Concepts and tools: Defining and articulating the need for information. Using available tools to access needed information effectively and efficiently. Interpret and apply the retrieved information successfully.
Handouts and Additional Documentation:

Handout

Applied Framework:

Searching as Strategic Exploration: Knowledge Practice 1
Searching as Strategic Exploration: Knowledge Practice 4
Searching as Strategic Exploration: Knowledge Practice 6
Searching as Strategic Exploration: Knowledge Practice 8

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Using www.socrative.com in Library Instruction

Year: 2015
Name: Stephanie King
Title: Presenter Title
Institution: Illinois Valley Community College
Session Description: My presentation will cover the basics of using the www.socrative.com website and allow the audience a chance to interact with questions through their phones or mobile devices. I will also explain how I have implemented socrative as both an icebreaker and assessment tool during library instruction sessions.
Target Audience: The usual audience for library instruction sessions at IVCC is first and second year undergraduate students. These students are usually in the process of completing a certificate or associate degree.
Student Learning Objectives:

After this presentation, participants will

  • understand how to use socrative as a tool for class assessment, as well as an aid for determining the prior knowledge of students.
  • learn that by using a quick question, as an icebreaker, the teacher can evaluate how much the students already know and create interaction early in the session.
Activity Description:

Over the past semester, I have used socrative in a number of library instruction sessions. These sessions typically last about an hour and take place in the library's computer lab. After a semester of successfully using the website: www.socrative.com in library instruction sessions, I am excited to share what I have learned with others. Socrative is a free website that allows teachers to interact with their students in real time.

Teachers have the option of asking an impromptu question of the class, or creating a quiz ahead of time. As students respond to multiple choice, true/false and short answer questions, their responses appear on the teacher's screen. Results can be displayed anonymously on the board, or viewed afterwards as a report, to assess whether the instruction session was effective. 

For a more in-depth approach, an end of class quiz can be created before the start of an instruction session. This allows the teacher time to consider what questions and data should be collected from the students. The answer report, generated by socrative at the end of a quiz, is a useful tool that can be used to assess whether students have learned the material covered in the instruction session.

Handouts and Additional Documentation:

N/A

Applied Framework:

Yet to be Assigned by the CARLI Instruction Committee

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Working World Internet Research

Year: 2015
Name: Elizabeth Nicholson
Title: Presenter Title
Institution: North Central College
Session Description: This research session is specifically tailored to the Business and Professional Communication course at North Central College. In order to create as realistic an experience as possible for these young professionals, the teaching faculty member and librarian collaborated to develop a research session that focuses on finding quality information from websites, rather than library databases.
Target Audience: "Mid" undergraduates - mostly sophomore or junior Communication or Business majors
Student Learning Objectives:
  • The course objectives for Business & Professional Communication are as follows; Students, at the end of the course, should be able to:
    • Analyze communication situations and audiences to make choices about the most effective and efficient way to communicate and deliver messages
    • Conduct research that includes the use of library resources and the Internet; use the results of that research to complete written and oral report
    • Deliver effective business presentations in contexts that may require either extemporaneous or impromptu oral presentations
    • Provide feedback, accept feedback, and use feedback to improve communication skills
    • Write business documents that are grammatically correct and use appropriate business style
    • Develop effective interpersonal communication skills
    • Use communication technology appropriately and effectively
Activity Description: As stated above, this session was created for SPC 230: Business and Professional Communication. The faculty member designed the course to include activities and assignments that simulate writing and research in the corporate environment, as students "join" a governmental task force. As part of this task force, the students must compose professional memos, voicemails, résumés, and white papers. These professional communications must contain data and information obtained through research. In this session, the teaching faculty member and librarian focus on:    Evaluation of information  Keyword/concept generation
Handouts and Additional Documentation:

Handout

Applied Framework:

Yet to be Assigned by the CARLI Instruction Committee
Based on this course's objectives, the ACRL Frames for Information Literacy that the librarian felt were most appropriate are:   Authority is constructed and contextual  Information creation as process  Searching as strategic exploration

Return to 2015 Table of Contents

Source Evaluation Quiz

Year: 2015
Name: Kimberly Shotick
Title: Presenter Title
Institution: Northeastern Illinios University
Session Description: Website evaluation can be a daunting task for students new to concepts of information literacy. Even with clear evaluation criteria, such as the CRAAP test developed by librarians at CSU Chico, students struggle to determine what a "good" source looks like on the Internet. By putting numerical values on CRAAP test evaluation criteria I created a quiz that can guide students in website evaluation.  This quiz is quick, effective, and fun for students. I will discuss different ways in which the quiz can be incorporated into a larger lesson plan.
Target Audience: early undergraduates
Student Learning Objectives:
  • Students will be able to evaluate Internet sources based on their credibility, relevancy, authority, accuracy, and purpose.
Activity Description:

The website evaluation quiz asks five simple yes or no questions (with an option to answer "I don't know"). Each answer carries a numerical value. The total score is added up and guides students to one of the following evaluative outcomes: "the website is probably okay to use, but may have some issues"; "use with caution—especially if you don’t  know the authority"; and, "stay away!" This quiz can be altered to evaluate any type of source (journal articles, books, etc.). It can be delivered online or on paper, and always incites lively discussion about source credibility.

Concepts included are evaluation of information, evaluation of source credibility, evaluation of the appropriateness/relevancy of source for research

Handouts and Additional Documentation:

Handout

Applied Framework:

Scholarship as Conversation: Knowledge Practice 4
Authority Is Constructed and Contextual: Knowledge Practice 2

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Flexible Models of Embedded Librarianship

Year: 2015
Name and Title: Randi Sutter
Colleen Bannon
Institution: Heartland Community College
Session Description:

Librarians at Heartland Community College responsively collaborate with English and Physical Therapy Assistant programs to provide timely library instruction, one-on-one research support, and curriculum development. The success of our embedded program is due to the cultivation of faculty/librarian relationships which allow us to negotiate assignment content, instruction scheduling and frequency, and student interactions outside of class. This session will address options for flexible embedded models driven by fluid, responsive relationships with faculty and tailored library instruction.

  • Physical Therapy Assistant Program (HLTH 225) has:
    • In-class library instruction for every class
    • Required research appointments
    • Librarian designed assignments
    • Curriculum development
  • Advanced Composition (ENGL 102)
    • Three in-class library sessions
    • Pre- and post- test of research process
    • Required research appointments
    • End-of-semester research reflection
Target Audience: First and second year students at a community college.
Student Learning Objectives:

ENGL 102 Research question: does intentional, integrated library support improve student confidence levels as well as persistence in a first-year writing course?  

Objectives: Gain insight into whether integrated library support helps students in an ENGL 102 course feel more confident about research-based writing.   The project required students to attend at least one library conference as part of their course grade. Additionally, the librarian made multiple visits to the class(es) in order to provide library instruction; the librarian also administered assessments which asked students to reflect on their research process.

    Activity Description:
    • Library instruction concepts:
      • Keyword generation
      • MeSH subject terms
      • Search strategy
      • Source evaluation
      • Research process
      • Research anxiety
    • Embedded model concepts:
      • Flipped classroom
      • Assignment negotiation
      • Research appointments
      • Relationship building
    Handouts and Additional Documentation:

    N/A

    Applied Framework:

    Searching as Strategic Exploration: Knowledge Practice 5
    Searching as Strategic Exploration: Knowledge Practice 7

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    Developing Initial Research Questions

    Year: 2015
    Name: Chelsea Van Riper
    Title: Presenter Title
    Institution: Principia College
    Session Description: Planning a library instruction session for an open-ended assignment can be difficult, and may even feel daunting, if student research topics are varied.  In this session, I will model several teaching techniques that encourage students to be reflective with their research topics and begin to transform their topics into initial research questions.  Participants will be encouraged to role-play and consider how these techniques contribute to a student’s success in the early stages of a research assignment.
    Target Audience: First year students, early undergraduate
    Student Learning Objectives:
    • The student will be able to write a research question
    Activity Description:

    This activity was used in a 100-level Sociology course.  It is possible that this activity could be used for courses in the Humanities and Social Sciences.

    Handouts and Additional Documentation:

    Handout

    Applied Framework:

    Research as Inquiry: Knowledge Practice 1
    Research as Inquiry: Knowledge Practice 2

    Return to 2015 Table of Contents


    Research environments

    Year: 2014
    Name: Crystal Boyce
    Title: Sciences Librarian
    Institution: Illinois Wesleyan University
    Session Description: A brief introduction to the kinds of research environments available to students, emphasizing the breadth and depth of each environment, along with the typical kinds of resources available in each environment.
    Target Audience: Introductory level students, flexible for any discipline
    Student Learning Objectives:
    • Students will identify the types of sources available in various research environments in order to understand how information systems are organized to access relevant information.
    • Students will compare the quality, quantity, and content of "found" sources in various research environments in order to understand that information sources vary greatly in content and format and have varying relevance and value, depending on the needs and nature of the search.
    • Students will discuss information needs relevant to their current assignment in order to match information needs to a particular search tool.
    Activity Description: This is an exercise based on an activity from the Information Literacy Instruction Cookbook, in which you introduce students to sources available within research environments. Basic instructional guidelines: break students up into 4 groups. Let each group observe the boxes lined up. Tell them to observe relative sizes, decoration, and what they can see peeking out of the boxes. Each group then takes a box back to their work areas and begins digging into the box. They are observing how much "fluff" there is, what kinds of sources are in it (you've printed off records or Google screen shots for each box), how much fluff relative to sources. Essentially they are trying to guess what kind of research environment they are working with. I ususally give them 5-7 minutes to discuss within groups.Teams will present their box, observations, and educated guesses to the whole class, in order from Google, multidisciplinary, single subject, catalog. You ask leading questions to help guide them during their group discussions and class presentations.
    Handouts and Additional Documentation:

    Research Environments Worksheet

    Image showing the Research Environment Boxes

    Applied Framework:

    Authority Is Constructed and Contextual: Knowledge Practice 4
    Scholarship as Conversation: Knowledge Practice 4
    Searching as Strategic Exploration: Knowledge Practice 2
    Searching as Strategic Exploration: Knowledge Practice 6

    Return to 2014 Table of Contents

    MindMeister- Researching On The Web

    Year: 2014
    Name: Mahrya Carncross
    Title: Instructional Services Librarian
    Institution: Western Illinois University
    Session Description: Using Mindmeister—an interactive, mind-mapping tool—I ask students to create a collaborative set of notes that we then discuss as a class. My presentation would give participants the chance to try the activity I’ve described. We would create an interactive mind map and generate a sample list of evaluations criteria.
    Target Audience: Appropriate for any level of library instruction.
    Student Learning Objectives:
    • Critically evaluate information
    Activity Description: I create a mindmap using a tool called Mindmeister. After reading a common article, students record their observations anonymously on the map, spurring classroom discussion.
    Handouts and Additional Documentation: Researching on the Web - Common Article
    Applied Framework:

    Scholarship as Conversation: Knowledge Practice 4
    Searching as Strategic Exploration: Knowledge Practice 3

    Return to 2014 Table of Contents

    Just get Started With Assessment

    Year: 2014
    Name and Title Ms. Meg Frazier-Information Literacy Librarian
    Dr. Megan Jaskowiak--Sciences/Health Sciences Librarian
    Institution: Bradley University
    Session Description: This session will showcase the “ three things I have learned” assessment used with beginning speech and English composition classes, and a new survey based on the Feedback Sheet designed by Will Thalheimer, an expert on adult learning and workplace training.
    Target Audience: Instruction Librarians
    Student Learning Objectives: n/a
    Activity Description: View PowerPoint PDF below
    Handouts and Additional Documentation:

    Just Get Started with Assessment

    PowerPoint PDF

    Applied Framework: Information Creation as a Process: Knowledge Practice 6
    Other Tools

    Return to 2014 Table of Contents

    Attribution Decay

    Year: 2014
    Name: Christina Heady
    Institution: Southern Illinois University - Carbondale
    Session Description: Using popular examples from BuzzFeed and Facebook, this is an activity called “Real or Rumor?” Participants will be shown examples of images and stories that have gone viral and asked to identify whether they are real or rumors using simultaneous reporting.
    Target Audience: Undergraduates; Freshman or Sophomores
    Student Learning Objectives:
    • Analyze real-life cases of plagiarism in order to describe the larger impact they had on society.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the value of intellectual property and research integrity.
    • Describe the purpose of academic integrity in relation to their own disciplines.
    Activity Description:
    1. This Lesson plan is intended for a credit-bearing course and is split into three sections: working as a class, in small groups, and finally independently. It can be adapted to a one-shot session by using part of the PowerPoint activity included.
    2. Begin class by passing out whatever materials you like to use for simultaneous reporting and explain the activity. In my example, I use red and greed paper.
    3. Go through the activity, giving as much detail about the different scenarios as you think your audience would benefit from.At the end of the activity is an opportunity for discussion about the concept of attribution decay and what it means today.
    4. If you have time, split students into small groups and pass out the worksheets on plagiarism. Assign each group a different case to research and report out after around 15 minutes.
    5. Conclude by assigning homework.
    Handouts and Additional Documentation:

    Attribution Decay Lesson Plan

    Attribution Decay PowerPoint

    Attribution Decay Worksheet

    Applied Framework:

    Authority Is Constructed and Contextual: Knowledge Practice 2
    Authority Is Constructed and Contextual: Knowledge Practice 4
    Scholarship as Conversation: Knowledge Practice 4

    Return to 2014 Table of Contents

    Creating Embedded Content

    Year: 2014
    Name: Cynthia Kremer
    Title: Instructor
    Institution: Benedictine University (at the time of the presentation, presenter was at National-Louis University)
    Session Description: An information literacy module that is part of a 3 week online orientation course will be presented. Discussion will focus on how to create an embedded experience without being embedded in a course and creating reusable content for future classes.
    Target Audience: Introductory Online Course for Undergraduate business students.
    Student Learning Objectives:
    1. Learn how to access the library databases.
    2. Cite a reference in APA format
    3. Evaluate the source using the C.R.A.A.P criteria
    Activity Description:

    This is a 3 part online discussion assignment.  

    The first part is to find an article and post a citation (Learning Objectives 1&2).  The second part is to evaluate the article based on the CRAAP criteria (Learning Objective 3).  The third part is to reply to a fellow students post (This represents Scholarship as Conversation). 

    Handouts and Additional Documentation: Creating Embedded Content
    Applied Framework:

    Authority Is Constructed and Contextual: Knowledge Practice 2
    Information has Value: Knowledge Practice 1
    Scholarship as Conversation: Knowledge Practice 1
    Scholarship as Conversation: Knowledge Practice 4

    Return to 2014 Table of Contents

    Keyword Development and Searching

    Year: 2014
    Name, Title, and Institution: Andrew Lenaghan, Library Instruction and Research Coordinator, Lewis University Library
    Melvin Whitehead, Public Services Librarian, Joliet Junior College
    Session Description: The presentation focuses on keyword development, boolean search strategies, and the exploration of reference sources as a starting point for research.
    Target Audience: First year college students
    Student Learning Objectives:
    • Identify the best databases to use for a research topic.
    • Create appropriate and effective search strings for database searches.
    • Identify broader, narrower, and related terms or concepts when initial searches retrieve few or no results.
    Activity Description:

    This activity works best when paired with a course research assignment, particularly at a point in the semester where the students have only a nebulous idea of their topics. I also like to let students work on the worksheet iteratively throughout the session, rather than doing the whole thing at the end of my lecture.
        
    I like to begin by discussing the importance of gathering background, contextual information about their topics before they dive in with their research. I then walk the students through using a reference database (e.g., Credo Reference) before the students complete Parts 1 and 2 of the worksheet. I typically give students 10 minutes to complete those parts and ask them to count their keywords when they are done. I stress to students the importance of getting as many words as possible (with a minimum of 10) to encourage them not to limit themselves (I also mention the record for the number of keywords generated by a single student for this activity, which is currently 92!). After they complete Part 1, I ask the student with the most keywords to quickly share with the class their topic and the keywords they came up with. While the student shares the keywords, I mentally to try to place them into different categories (e.g., words dealing with different aspects of the topic) to demonstrate how this process can also help them narrow their topic to focus on specific themes or ideas within their topic.

    Next, I talk about refining the scope of their topics.  I walk students through a chart that describes the various ways you can narrow or broaden your topic and discuss the consequences of having a topic that is too broad or too narrow (see attached). For the chart on the left for “Too Broad”, I ask them which 3 components from the chart I used to develop my more narrow research question at the bottom of the chart (time period, event/aspect, and population).

    I then segue into a discussion about Boolean search strings by asking them if they think it is a good idea to enter all of our keywords (from Part 2 of the worksheet) into a database or search engine? Why or why not? I tell them that we need a way to combine our keywords in a way that makes sense and yields the results we want. I then do the Human Boolean activity (see attached). After we do the Human Boolean activity, I give the students 5-10 minutes to work on develop their own search strings (stressing that they must use both AND and OR for each string – I don’t ask the students to use “NOT” because I tell them that “NOT” is usually added after you have already started your search and see what kinds of results appear). Afterwards, I ask for one or two students to share their topic and one of their search strings. I offer constructive feedback to each. I then give the students time to enter their search strings into a database.  

    Handouts and Additional Documentation:

    Although it is possible to do this for a 50 minute class, I find it works best when I have at least an hour or more with the students, particularly if I want to leave time for covering any other material about the databases. I have attached the worksheet, the Human Boolean activity, a screenshot of the Refining Your Topic chart, and a pre-test/post-test I use to assess the skills covered in the session. I print the pre-test/post-test on back-to-back sides and give them to the students as they walk into the class. I leave the last 5 minutes of class for them to flip to the back to take the post-test.

    Refine Topic Lesson Plan

    Human Boolean Lesson Plan

    Keyword Search Worksheet

    Assessment: Pre and Post Test

    Applied Framework:

    Research as Inquiry: Knowledge Practice 2
    Research as Inquiry: Knowledge Practice 3
    Searching as Strategic Exploration: Knowledge Practice 4
    Searching as Strategic Exploration: Knowledge Practice 5
    Searching as Strategic Exploration: Knowledge Practice 7

    Return to 2014 Table of Contents

    Flipped Classroom: Exercises for Database Searching

    Year: 2014
    Name and Title: Jeannette Moss, User Education Librarian
    Lauren McKeen, User Education and Web User Support Librarian
    Institution: Northwestern University Library
    Session Description: We will give very brief background on the class assignment and also the reason that this particular session became a flipped classroom format. We will also share our flipped class experience with the audience and some interesting teachable moments that arose during the student activity and presentations in the session.
    Target Audience: Freshmen and Sophomores
    Student Learning Objectives:
    • Students will be able to access library databases.
    • Students will construct keyword searches based on topics.
    • Students will effectively search databases for relevant, scholarly content
    Activity Description:

    For an Eng 205 Composition class, we sent, ahead of time, 3 instructional videos we had created, so that students could view them before the instruction session.  Students came to class with their research topics.  We gave them a short 3 question Clickers poll to assess their comprehension of the tutorials, revisited with them any areas about which they were unclear based on the poll, and then broke them into 4 groups, with one research database assigned per group. Each group worked through their database with one of their own topics or the assigned topic while answering the questions on this worksheet.  Each group then presented to the rest of the class on what they discovered and learned while searching. Students discovered thesaurus searching, advanced keyword techniques such as the use of NOT, that they might have to search, refine, search again before finding worthy material, and that there are important distinctions among different databases / search tools. This activity works really well if students are coming in to the session at the point of need, when they are forming their research topics.  Learning objects sent ahead of time were some of the tutorials. Let us know if you’d like to use the videos!

    If you don’t use Clickers, you can poll your audience’s learning with these or other applications:

    Poll Everywhere
    Springshare Libguides polling feature
    Kahoot

    Handouts and Additional Documentation:

    Prezi Presentation

    Exercises for Database Searching (Flipped Classroom Group Activity)

    Applied Framework:

    Searching as Strategic Exploration: Knowledge Practice 4
    Searching as Strategic Exploration: Knowledge Practice 7

    Return to 2014 Table of Contents


    Discovery tools are like shopping for jeans

    Year: 2013
    Name: Molly Beestrum
    Title: Library Instruction Coordinator
    Institution: Columbia College Chicago
    Session Description: When you’re looking for a new pair of jeans, there are a number of factors to consider before you can find your “perfect pair.”  Without a lot of conscious thought, we use limiters to narrow our search through the choices we make (price, fit, size, color, brand, etc.)  We sometimes have to try on several (or a dozen) pairs before finding one that works well, much like we have to look at several (or a dozen) sources to find the book or article that is most relevant, current, and authoritative.  This presentation will demonstrate how the analogy can be applied in an instruction setting.
    Target Audience: Undergraduate students, 1st or 2nd year students primarily.
    Student Learning Objectives:
    • Students will see the connection between setting limits in an online database when looking for information and the types of limits we unconsciously set when shopping for material items like jeans (both online and in real life).
    Activity Description:

    Activity Description: For this activity I began with the analogy of shopping for jeans and “shopping” for resources. I asked students to think about their experiences shopping for jeans (in real life) and the types of criteria they have when shopping: e.g. price, size, fit, color, brand, etc).  I make a list of their criteria on the board based on their responses.  Then I go to a retail website – Macy’s or Amazon work well for this exercise and I type in jeans to demonstrate that when shopping online we encounter those same criteria for limiting our search.

    I show the way that selecting the various criteria or changing the sort feature helps narrow our search results and makes them more relevant. Then I open up a library database like Academic Search Complete and do a search for a broad topic, e.g. Fashion, and we discuss the limiters available in the databases (e.g. date, peer-reviewed, full-text, etc.). This is a quick activity to get students acclimated to using library databases and can be done in just a few minutes. It works well to quickly engage students by asking questions and relating library sources to their everyday lives.

    Handouts and Additional Documentation: Discovery Tools are like Shopping for Jeans 
    Applied Framework:

    Research as Inquiry: Knowledge Practice 7
    Searching as Strategic Exploration: Knowledge Practice 3
    Searching as Strategic Exploration: Knowledge Practice 5
    Searching as Strategic Exploration: Knowledge Practice 6

    Return to 2013 Table of Contents

    Oh Rats!

    Year: 2013
    Name: Mahrya Carncross
    Title: Instructional Services Librarian
    Institution: Western Illinois University
    Session Description: The RAT is a 10-question quiz that students first take individually, and then as groups, in order to test their readiness for a module's content.
    Target Audience: Assessment method could be appropriate for any level of library instruction, where students are able to work together in groups.
    Student Learning Objectives:
    • Develop compelling research questions through the acquisition of working knowledge.
    • Identify appropriate tools and sources to answer research questions.
    • Develop effective and efficient search strategies to find a range of appropriate information sources.
    • Critically evaluate information using sets of self-defined criteria.
    • Use information ethically, avoiding plagiarism and respecting the intellectual property of others.
    • Weave new information into the student’s own knowledge structure in order to create a scholarly product.
    Activity Description: Oh RATs! Harnessing the Power of Teamwork in the Flipped Classroom: In this assessment method, students conduct a series of readings and/or video viewings before class.  During class students are given an individual Readiness Assessment Test (iRAT), then meet with their teams.  Students take the same test as a team.  Teams discuss the best answer for each question and indicate their choice on a card.  Based on the results of these low-stakes RATS, the instructor can plan subsequent classroom activities.
    Handouts and Additional Documentation: Not provided.
    Applied Framework: Other Tools

    Return to 2013 Table of Contents

    Increasing Engagement With Poll Everywhere

    Year: 2013
    Name: Larissa Garcia
    Title: Library Faculty
    Institution: Northern Illinois University (at the time of this presentation, presenter was at Triton College)
    Session Description: Using Poll Everywhere, an online audience response tool, is an effective way to encourage student engagement during instruction sessions. While the tool can be used for a variety of sessions, this particular example demonstrates how to incorporate it into an Avoiding Plagiarism Workshop. It can be used to introduce specific plagiarism concepts to get a sense of what students know or do not know. The real-time survey aspect of this tool helps to encourage participation and student interaction during the session. Depending on class responses, the surveys also serve as jumping off points for discussion or brief lecture.
    Target Audience: First and second year undergraduates
    Student Learning Objectives:
    • To recognize when to cite sources and when it is not necessary.
    • To identify proper citation techniques in order to avoid plagiarism.
    Activity Description:

    The Triton College Library has started using Poll Everywhere, an online audience response software, to encourage student engagement during some instruction sessions. While we use this response tool for various sessions, I would specifically like to demonstrate how we incorporate Poll Everywhere into our Avoiding Plagiarism Workshop.

    To introduce specific plagiarism concepts (I will pick only two concepts to discuss in order to meet the time limit), I poll students to get a sense of what they know or do not know. The real-time survey aspect of this tool helps to encourage participation and student interaction during the session. Depending on class responses, the surveys also serve as jumping off points for discussion or brief lecture.  We also do a plagiarism exercise at the end of the session to informally assess whether or not students can identify plagiarism within writing passages.

    Handouts and Additional Documentation: Sample Plagiarism In-Class Exercise
    Applied Framework:

    Information Creation as a Process: Knowledge Practice 7
    Information has Value: Knowledge Practice 1
    Scholarship as Conversation: Knowledge Practice 1

    Return to 2013 Table of Contents

    Using Google Spreadsheets for Real-Time Assessment

    Year: 2013
    Name: Michelle Guittar
    Title: Social Sciences Librarian
    Institution: Northeastern Illinois University
    Session Description: In this session, Guittar demonstrated how instruction librarians could use Google Spreadsheets, which allow for real-time editing of a spreadsheet, in library instruction sessions to track student learning. While this activity does allow the librarian to see if students are grasping concepts right away, in a larger class, the activity could become unmanageable if not tied to strong learning outcomes.
    Target Audience: Instruction Librarians
    Activity Description: Review PDF.
    Handouts and Additional Documentation: Using Google Spreadsheets Presentation
    Applied Framework: Other Tools

    Return to 2013 Table of Contents

    Locating Academic Sources

    Year: 2013
    Name: Heather Jagman
    Title: Coordinator of Reference, Instruction and Academic Engagement
    Institution: DePaul University Library
    Session Description: In this exercise, students sit in groups of three and work as a team to identify and locate the health and nutrition research being reported on in various popular media reports. Because citations are rarely given in newspapers and magazines, students learn how to recognize and identify the amount of information needed to track down the background research. This exercise typically includes articles which demonstrate that sometimes research articles are available for free, some are available exclusively via library databases, and some are not journal articles at all, but grey literature or other types of research reports. Along the way, the class considers how the articles ended up in the places that we found them, and what information provided by the news story was most useful in helping track the article down.
    Target Audience: Undergraduates, lower level
    Student Learning Objectives:
    • Students will learn how to locate scholarly information and original research based on the limited information provided by the popular media.
    • This exercise can frame discussions of the value/cost of original research as well as frame searching as strategic exploration.
    Activity Description: Students sit in small groups of two or three and work as a team to identify and locate the original health and nutrition research being reported on in various popular media reports. This activity typically includes popular media pieces in which the research being described leads students to research articles that are available for free, other pieces that lead to research available exclusively via library databases, and some which lead to information that was not published in a journal at all, but is instead grey literature or another type of research reports. Along the way, we talk about how and why the articles ended up in the places that we found them, and what information provided by the news story was most useful in helping track the article down.  (This exercise was originally developed to support a course called Health Research Literacy.)
    Handouts and Additional Documentation: Locating Academic Sources
    Applied Framework:

    Authority Is Constructed and Contextual: Knowledge Practice 1
    Authority Is Constructed and Contextual: Knowledge Practice 2
    Authority Is Constructed and Contextual: Knowledge Practice 4
    Information Creation as a Process: Knowledge Practice 4
    Information Creation as a Process: Knowledge Practice 6

    Return to 2013 Table of Contents

    Source Evaluation: Content and Appropriateness

    Year: 2013
    Name: Laura Mondt
    Title: Coordinator of Instructional Services
    Institution: Richland Community College
    Session Description: Students will receive a handout describing how to evaluate information. Students will be divided into groups of 2-4 and given a mock assignment. The assignment will briefly provide a topic and source requirements. Students will then receive a journal or magazine article. They will have to evaluate not only the content of the information but also figure out whether or not it fits their assignment source requirements. Groups then report back to the class. This activity aims to teach students how to find sources that meet what their instructor wants as well as reinforces the differences between magazine and journal sources.
    Target Audience: First year college students
    Student Learning Objectives:
    • Students will learn to identify information needed for citations by examining a journal article.
    • Students will use the CRAAP test in order to determine the quality of their resource.
    • Students will examine assignment criteria to determine whether the article can be used to fulfill the stated research requirements.
    Activity Description:

    Students will be given an evaluating sources handout (CRAAP test adaptation) and it will be discussed in class to introduce students to the topic. Students will be handed an assignment and journal or magazine article. In groups of 2-4, students will evaluate the given source using the evaluating sources handout as well as determining whether it fits the needs of their assignment.  Students then report their findings to the class by providing a brief description of the resource, how it fits with their assignment requirements, and comment on the reliability of the information in the articles.

    [Example assignments and discussion questions in word document from presenter]

    Handouts and Additional Documentation:

    Source Evaluation: Content and Appropriateness

    Lesson Plan

    Applied Framework:

    Authority Is Constructed and Contextual: Knowledge Practice 4
    Information Creation as a Process: Knowledge Practice 4
    Research as Inquiry: Knowledge Practice 2

    Return to 2013 Table of Contents

    Wikipedia As A Research Tool

    Year: 2013
    Name: Alexis Shpall Wolstein
    Title: Instruction Librarian
    Institution: Milner Library – Illinois State University
    Session Description: Chances are you've told at least one student, if not a whole class of them, never to cite Wikipedia. Even the free online encyclopedia's founder, Jimmy Wales, discouraged college students from citing it, saying, "For God sakes, you're in college; don't cite the encyclopedia!" But it remains true that students feel comfortable with Wikipedia and will use it to find information. So how can we capitalize on the ease with which students search Wikipedia? By emphasizing to them that it is a tool and not a citable resource. In this session, Wikipedia is used as a tool to assist students in evaluating source credibility and to understand more fully the importance of citation.
    Target Audience: lower level undergraduates
    Student Learning Objectives:
    • Beginning the research process.
    • Narrowing down a broad subject into a feasible research topic.
    • Discovering keywords d)Evaluating a source's credibility
    Activity Description: Prezi Presentation
    Handouts and Additional Documentation: Wikipedia Handout
    Applied Framework:

    Authority Is Constructed and Contextual: Knowledge Practice 2
    Authority Is Constructed and Contextual: Knowledge Practice 4
    Research as Inquiry: Knowledge Practice 2
    Research as Inquiry: Knowledge Practice 3
    Searching as Strategic Exploration: Knowledge Practice 5

    Return to 2013 Table of Contents


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