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Toolkit: Authority Is Constructed and Contextual- KPs

Overview

"Information resources reflect their creators’ expertise and credibility, and are evaluated based on the information need and the context in which the information will be used. Authority is constructed in that various communities may recognize different types of authority. It is contextual in that the information need may help to determine the level of authority required." ACRL Framework

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Learners who are developing their information literate abilities do the following:

Knowledge Practice 1

Define different types of authority, such as subject expertise (e.g., scholarship), societal position (e.g., public office or title), or special experience (e.g., participating in a historic event).

Interrogating Sources with First Year Students- Martinique Hallerduff & Jennifer Lau-Bond, Dominican University & Harper College, 2017

Peer Review- Christina Heady & Joshua Vossler, Southern Illinois University Carbondale, 2016

Political Internet Literacy- Jennifer Schwartz, DePaul University, 2016

Identifying, Analyzing, and Evaluating Primary Sources- Belinda Cheek & Kimberly Butler, North Central College, 2015

Locating Academic Sources, Heather Jagman, Depaul University, 2013

Knowledge Practice 2

Use research tools and indicators of authority to determine the credibility of sources, understanding the elements that might temper this credibility.

The Scholarly Article Autopsy: Information Sources from the Inside Out- Krista Bowers Sharpe, Western Illinois University, 2017

Traversing the Terrain of 21st Century Publishing: A Practicum- Sarah Dick & Susan Franzen, Illinois State University, 2017

Interrogating Sources with First Year Students- Martinique Hallerduff & Jennifer Lau-Bond, Dominican University & Harper College, 2017

Finding, Interpreting, and Evaluating Statistical Data Sources for the Arts- April Levy, Columbia College, 2016

Political Internet Literacy- Jennifer Schwartz, DePaul University, 2016

Evaluating Sources: What is a 'Reliable' Source?- Kelly Grossmann, Northeastern Illinois University, 2015

Identifying, Analyzing, and Evaluating Primary Sources- Belinda Cheek & Kimberly Butler, North Central College, 2015

Source Evaluation Quiz- Kimberly Shotick, Northeastern Illinios University, 2015

Attribution Decay, Christina Heady, Southern Illinois University, 2014

Creating Embedded Content- Cynthia Kremer, Benedictine University, 2014

Locating Academic Sources, Heather Jagman, DePaul University, 2013​

Wikipedia as a Research Tool, Alexis Shpall Wolstein, Milner Library – Illinois State University, 2013

Knowledge Practice 3

Understand that many disciplines have acknowledged authorities in the sense of well-known scholars and publications that are widely considered standard. Even in those situations, some scholars would challenge the authority of those sources.

Identifying, Analyzing, and Evaluating Primary Sources- Belinda Cheek & Kimberly Butler, North Central College, 2015

Knowledge Practice 4

Recognize that authoritative content may be packaged formally or informally and may include sources of all media types.

Interrogating Sources with First Year Students- Martinique Hallerduff & Jennifer Lau-Bond, Dominican University & Harper College, 2017

Attribution Decay, Christina Heady, Southern Illinois University, 2014

Research Environments- Crystal Boyce, Illinois Wesleyan University, 2014

Locating Academic Sources, Heather Jagman, DePaul University, 2013​

Source Evaluation: Context and Appropriateness- Laura Mondt, Richland Community College, 2013

Wikipedia as a Research Tool, Alexis Shpall Wolstein, Milner Library – Illinois State University, 2013

Knowledge Practice 5

Acknowledge they are developing their own authoritative voices in a particular area and recognize the responsibilities this entails, including seeking accuracy and reliability, respecting intellectual property, and participating in communities of practice.

Knowledge Practice 6

Understand the increasingly social nature of the information ecosystem where authorities actively connect with one another and sources develop over time.


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