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CARLI Digital Collections Featured Image: Planetary-scale Data Rendering in Autostereoscopic Virtual Reality

Thursday, September 25, 2008 - 9:33pm

From the The Image of Research (2008) (University of Illinois at Chicago) in CARLI Digital Collections.

Robert Kooima, a doctoral candidate in Computer Science at the Electronic Visualization Laboratory, was one of the finalists in the Image of Research competition with this photograph titled “Planetary-scale Data Rendering in Autostereoscopic Virtual Reality.”

In the accompanying text, Kooima explains how the image relates to his research: “First, the application is my planetary-scale data visualization tool displaying NASA Shuttle Radar Topography Mission elevation data with the Blue Marble Next Generation color map. … Second, the display in the image is the Electronic Visualization Laboratory’s Varrier autostereoscopic virtual reality environment. … My research in GPU-based techniques for parallax-barrier autostereo rendering enabled high-performance sub-pixel image interleaving, doubling the effective resolution of the display and allowing 20/30 visual acuity.”

The first annual interdisciplinary competition, sponsored by the University of Illinois at Chicago’s Graduate College and the University Library, was open to any student enrolled in a graduate or professional degree program at UIC for the Spring 2008 term. Students were invited to submit an image with aesthetic appeal that they created as part of their research.

Seventy-one students from a wide range of academic disciplines—including anthropology, architecture, bioengineering, biomedical visualization, computer science, and microbiology/immunization—submitted entries. A multi-disciplinary jury reviewed the submissions and selected 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place winners as well as three honorable mentions.

The Image of Research digital collection features the works created by the winners and finalists in the competition.

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CARLI Digital Collections Featured Image: College of St. Francis Bulletin 1964-1965, 1965-1966

Thursday, September 18, 2008 - 2:18pm

From the USF Catalog Covers (University of Saint Francis) in CARLI Digital Collections.

This collection from the University of St. Francis reproduces the covers of the school’s catalogs held in the USF Library Archives, from the school’s beginnings as The New College in 1925 through the present. At the time of this Bulletin, the College of St. Francis (the fourth name of the school, 1931-1998) was a four-year liberal arts college for women.

In addition to tracing the history of the university, the images in this collection also show trends and developments in graphic design and typography. In the mid-1960s, for example, American graphic design was influenced by a range of European modernist movements. With its asymmetrical composition of geometric forms (notably, rectangles) on a horizontal-vertical grid, as well as the use of sans-serif typefaces Futura and Bernhard Gothic, this cover from the academic years 1964-1965 and 1965-1966 draws on early 20th-century styles such as Bauhaus, De Stijl, and the International Typographic Style.

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CARLI Digital Collections Featured Image: Juniors 1919

Friday, September 12, 2008 - 8:12am

From the John Jochman Album (Benedictine University) in CARLI Digital Collections.

The John Jochman Album contains 345 images relating to the history of Benedictine University between 1917 and 1923, at which time the institution was known as St. Procopius College, or "S.P.C." During this period, Mr. Jochman attended the high school on the St. Procopius campus and also spent a year at the college. He compiled this album of photographs, taken by monks and students at St. Procopius, depicting student and campus life as well as the buildings and grounds.

Mr. Jochman inscribed titles on the photographs, aiding in identifying their subjects. In this example, a group portrait of a junior class football team, "Juniors 1919" is written in ink at the top center of the image.

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CARLI Digital Collections Featured Image: Montessori Broad Stair

Friday, August 29, 2008 - 2:01pm

From the Elizabeth Harrison-Chicago Kindergarten Movement (National-Louis University) collection in CARLI Digital Collections.

The Broad Stair is an educational toy developed by Maria Montessori in the beginning of the 20th century, and it is designed to teach a student about shape, small differences in size, color and also to prepare them from working with a decimal system. The object of this game is for the student to learn how to arrange the blocks on the floor, from largest to smallest, to create a stair shape. The exercise is very similar to 2 other block set games using the Pink Tower and the Narrow Stair. Working with these kinds of toys, the students eventually learn to distinguish small differences in size just by sight, while at the same time improving their hand-eye coordination and their ability to put objects in order.

This block set, like most Montessori toys, is based on the number “10.” There are 10 blocks in the full set, each 20cm long, the cross section of the largest block is 10cm squared, with each block next in the stair being 1cm squared smaller on the cross section then the previous block. Her purpose for this was to make students comfortable working with, and thinking of terms of, the number 10. She believed this better prepared students to work with mathematics later in life, which is a system also based on the number 10.

All the Montessori toys at National Louis University were brought from Italy by the American Kindergartener Elizabeth Harrison in 1912 after traveling to study Maria Montessori’s methods. Harrison later published a comparative study of the Montessori and Kindergarten Methods for the US Bureau of Education, The Montessori Method and the Kindergarten, in 1914.

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