Tips and Tricks

Reports Webinar Recordings Posted for February and March

The recordings for the February and March webinars have been posted to the Voyager Reports Mini-Webinar page. Along with the videos, you’ll find SQL for some of the demonstrated queries, as well as the slides for each session. 

Staff that search the website for the webinars may also find them linked from the event notices on the calendar as well.

Voyager Reports Mini-Webinar

Each month, CARLI staff will offer a brief, mini-webinar to share tips, tricks, and techniques on generating reports from Voyager. Each webinar will provide an opportunity for questions and answers on Voyager reporting tools, such as Access and Web Reports, and on topics of broad interest, such as techniques for gathering circulation statistics or developing reports for responding to ACRL and IPEDS surveys. We’ll have information for you, and we hope you will have ideas for us as well.

Recording for First Voyager Reports Webinar Available

The recording for the first Voyager Reports Mini-Webinar, held on January 18, is now available for viewing. Those interested may find the recording and the SQL generated during the session at the Reports Webinar page.

Voyager Reports Mini-Webinar

Each month, CARLI staff will offer a brief, mini-webinar to share tips, tricks, and techniques on generating reports from Voyager. Each webinar will provide an opportunity for questions and answers on Voyager reporting tools, such as Access and Web Reports, and on topics of broad interest, such as techniques for gathering circulation statistics or developing reports for responding to ACRL and IPEDS surveys. We’ll have information for you, and we hope you will have ideas for us as well.

Voyager Reports Mini-Webinar for January

Beginning in January 2017, CARLI staff will offer a brief, monthly, mini-webinar to share tips, tricks, and techniques on generating reports from Voyager. Each webinar will provide an opportunity for questions and answers on Voyager reporting tools, such as Access and Web Reports, and on topics of broad interest, such as techniques for gathering circulation statistics or developing reports for responding to ACRL and IPEDS surveys. We’ll have information for you, and we hope you will have ideas for us as well.

SFX Open Conference call

Open conference call for SFX administrators. Topics TBA.

 

Join by phone

+1 217 332 6338 (Site1-Dialin-region)                            English (United States)

+1 312 994 8410 (Site1-Dialin-region)                            English (United States)  

+1 888 983 3631 (Site1-Dialin-region)                            English (United States)  

Find a local number

 

Instruction: April Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

Overwhelmed by the two drafts of the new Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education that will update the current standards from 2000? >Read on to find a quick list of links to discover what other librarians are saying on the subject and join in on the discussion.

Instruction: February Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

During the Fall 2013 semester, the CARLI Instruction Committee hosted a three-part webinar series on assessment. All three recorded webinars are now available for you to watch, at your convenience.

Knowing is Half the Battle! Assessment in Academic Libraries
Recorded November 4, 2013. Presented by Devin Savage, Jeannette Moss, & Chris Davidson from Northwestern.

Using Rubrics to Assess Student Learning
Recorded on November 18, 2013. Presented by Lisa Janicke Hinchliffe, UIUC.

Instruction: November Tips, Tricks, & Techniques

Recently, my 10 year old nephew showed me his book report in the form of a board game, which made me think about how dry adult education tends to feel in comparison to some of the fun ways children learn. However, recent research indicates that creative play encourages learning, even for adults. We tend to view children as not-quite-formed adults who need coddling. Flipping this belief, Kets de Vries (2012) argues that “better and more respective teaching would follow if … [instructors] thought of adults as atrophied children” (p. 18).